Metal Building Colors

Exterior color combinations and popular color choices

Metal building colors for exterior roof and siding panels

When planning your new structure, one of the most challenging aspects of the design process can be deciding on a color scheme for your new building. Not only does your choice of color impact your enjoyment of the building’s appearance, but it can also influence the building’s curb appeal, total cost, and energy efficiency.

With a steel building, you can completely customize your metal roof and siding color combinations when selecting your design features. All of our suppliers offer pre-painted siding and roof paneling available in 12-20 standard colors and even more specialty options. This page features the most widely available standard color options the major metal siding and roofing manufacturers offer.

To help you mix and match potential color palettes, we created a metal building color visualizer using colors from the standard color chart.

Color Visualizer
  • Siding
    • Polar White
    • Bone White
    • Charcoal Gray
    • Quaker Gray
    • Ash Gray
    • Taupe
    • Light Stone
    • Desert Sand
    • Saddle Tan
    • Copper Penny
    • Medium Bronze
    • Burnished Slate
    • Koko Brown
    • Burgundy
    • Brite Red
    • Crimson Red
    • Classic Green
    • Hunter Green
    • Colony Green
    • Cobalt Blue
    • Hawaiian Blue
    • Coal Black
  • Roof
    • Polar White
    • Bone White
    • Charcoal Gray
    • Quaker Gray
    • Ash Gray
    • Taupe
    • Light Stone
    • Desert Sand
    • Saddle Tan
    • Copper Penny
    • Medium Bronze
    • Burnished Slate
    • Koko Brown
    • Burgundy
    • Brite Red
    • Crimson Red
    • Classic Green
    • Hunter Green
    • Colony Green
    • Cobalt Blue
    • Hawaiian Blue
    • Coal Black
  • Trim
    • Polar White
    • Bone White
    • Charcoal Gray
    • Quaker Gray
    • Ash Gray
    • Taupe
    • Light Stone
    • Desert Sand
    • Saddle Tan
    • Copper Penny
    • Medium Bronze
    • Burnished Slate
    • Koko Brown
    • Burgundy
    • Brite Red
    • Crimson Red
    • Classic Green
    • Hunter Green
    • Colony Green
    • Cobalt Blue
    • Hawaiian Blue
    • Coal Black
  • Doors
    • Polar White
    • Bone White
    • Charcoal Gray
    • Quaker Gray
    • Ash Gray
    • Taupe
    • Light Stone
    • Desert Sand
    • Saddle Tan
    • Copper Penny
    • Medium Bronze
    • Burnished Slate
    • Koko Brown
    • Burgundy
    • Brite Red
    • Crimson Red
    • Classic Green
    • Hunter Green
    • Colony Green
    • Cobalt Blue
    • Hawaiian Blue
    • Coal Black
  • Wainscoting
    • Polar White
    • Bone White
    • Charcoal Gray
    • Quaker Gray
    • Ash Gray
    • Taupe
    • Light Stone
    • Desert Sand
    • Saddle Tan
    • Copper Penny
    • Medium Bronze
    • Burnished Slate
    • Koko Brown
    • Burgundy
    • Brite Red
    • Crimson Red
    • Classic Green
    • Hunter Green
    • Colony Green
    • Cobalt Blue
    • Hawaiian Blue
    • Coal Black

Please note:

  • Colors vary from supplier to supplier, and specific color options and names change.
  • Color options also differ depending on the gauge of steel used for the metal panels (26 gauge vs. 24 gauge).
  • Due to monitor and screen settings, the colors you see on your screen may not precisely match the actual colors. 
  • Once you have chosen a building supplier, we recommend you ask them to send you sample color swatches (or a printed color chart) so that you can see the actual colors in natural lighting conditions.

Get Four Quotes

Compare prices from local suppliers and save
Get Prices

Specialty and custom colors are available from certain building suppliers upon request and are available in over 100 options, including unique effects such as matte, color-changing, patina, and woodgrain finishes.

Whether selecting from standard or specialty colors, you’ll benefit from top-of-the-line coatings that preserve the quality of your building. Every paint option is designed to last, drawing upon modern advancements in paint chemistry to prevent degradation.

40-year warranties protect all paints. Unpainted panels coated with galvalume (a zinc-aluminum coating) are typically warranted for up to 20 years. This type of finish is most common on industrial metal roofs and Quonset hut buildings.

Metal siding and roofing panels are manufactured in 26 gauge thickness as standard. However, there are different sets of color options depending on whether you opt for the 26 gauge standard or the thicker 24 gauge option. Offering this wide range of selections ensures your building kit will meet your aesthetic needs just as well as fulfill your need for durability and stability.

Read on to learn more about what choices are available for metal building colors and how to select the options that work best for your project.

Metal Building Color Schemes

Evaluating choices for steel building colors takes time and careful consideration. Since both the siding and roofing can be given their own hues, a wide variety of combinations are possible.

Here are some initial steps to assist you in choosing a color scheme:

Step #1: Explore color palettes & photo galleries
Exploring different exterior color palettes online is easily one of the best first steps you can take when choosing a color for your new building. Start with online image searches for your favorite primary colors and chosen style and work from there.

Step #2: Look at color options from manufacturers and request samples
Once you have an idea of the color palette that you like or believe would work with your building, it's time to look at different manufacturers' colors. Again, start by doing online searches for metal roofing and siding companies. Once you receive the colors you want samples of, you can go out to the property and compare the colors with the other building elements and environment elements.

Step #3: Discuss options with your contractor or architect
When you're close to the end of making your color choice, it's time to have another discussion with the contractor or architect.

Popular Metal Building Color Combinations

There are a few common color combinations for metal homes and other structures, whether for residential, agricultural, or commercial use. These are typically two-tone color combos, which can be divided into two types.

High-contrast
High-contrast combinations of color create a striking look. It is usually achieved by selecting a dark rooftop and light paneling, but the reverse is also becoming increasingly fashionable. The high-contrast style is traditional, with roots in Farmhouse, Colonial, Georgian, and Spanish/Mediterranean architecture.

  • Crimson Red + Polar White
  • Cobalt Blue + Bone White
  • Hunter Green + Desert Sand

Low-contrast and tone-on-tone
Low-contrast color themes create a harmonious look without dramatic shifts between the colors. Different colors can be selected for the roofing and siding, but they won’t be significantly lighter or darker than one another. The low-contrast style can be found in various architectural styles, including Modern, Southwestern, and Bungalow.

In tone-on-tone themes, colors of the same type are chosen but in subtly different shades. The result is a soothing, understated look that blends into the environment.

  • Black + Charcoal Gray
  • Ash Gray + Light Stone
  • Brown + Copper

Get Four Quotes

Compare prices from local suppliers and save
Get Prices

Popular Color Schemes

Metal Home Color Schemes

Copper Penny & Gray
Copper Penny & Gray
Copper Penny & Gray
Next Slide
Burnished Slate and Charcoal steel building
Burnished Slate and Charcoal
Burnished Slate and Charcoal
Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide
Black on Black
Black on Black
White with Black Trim
White with Black Trim
White with Black Trim
Previous SlidePrevious Slide

Shop House Color Schemes

Burnished Slate & Black Trim
Burnished Slate & Black Trim
Burnished Slate & Black Trim
Next Slide
Ash Gray & Charcoal Metal Building
Ash Gray & Charcoal
Brown & Tan
Brown & Tan
Copper Penny & Black
Copper Penny & Black
Copper Penny & Black
Previous SlidePrevious Slide

Garage, Shop Color Combos

Cobalt Blue & White building color scheme
Cobalt Blue & White
Cobalt Blue & White
Next Slide
Taupe & Brown garage color combination
Taupe & Brown
Black & White Garage color scheme
Black & White Garage
Charcoal Gray Steel Building with Black Trim
Charcoal Gray Metal Building with Black Trim
Charcoal Gray Metal Building with Black Trim
Previous SlidePrevious Slide

Common Barn Colors

Colony Green Building
Colony Green Metal Building
Colony Green Metal Building
Next Slide
Red Steel Building (Rustic Red & White)
Red Steel Building (Rustic Red & White)
Red Steel Building (Rustic Red & White)
Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide
Light Stone & Tan
Light Stone & Tan
Burgundy & Gray Barn
Burgundy & Gray Barn
Burgundy & Gray Barn
Previous SlidePrevious Slide

Common Warehouse Colors

Hawaiian Blue & White color combo
Hawaiian Blue & White
Hawaiian Blue & White
Next Slide
White & Grey building colors
White & Grey
Quaker Gray & Ash Gray
Quaker Gray & Ash Gray
Quaker Gray & Ash Gray
Previous SlidePrevious Slide Next Slide
Burnished Slate & Gray exterior paint colors
Burnished Slate & Gray
Burnished Slate & Gray
Previous SlidePrevious Slide

Get Four Quotes

Compare prices from local suppliers and save
Get Prices

Choosing a Metal Building Color Scheme

While there are numerous options for exterior color schemes, which ones are most appropriate depends upon a few factors unique to your circumstances.

  • Regional Style and Color Trends

    The location of your metal house or building can have a notable influence on which colors and themes would be the best fit. Regions tend to have their own architectural styles and trends, which extend to color palettes.

    Picking a color combination that is aligned with your region’s characteristic aesthetic can help your property feel like a cohesive part of its surroundings, which can translate into greater desirability and value. Below are some examples of common regional color palettes.

    Southwest
    Southwestern color themes draw upon the natural colors present in the arid desert environment, as well as those commonly found in Spanish, Mexican, and Native American homes.

    Cobalt Blue
    Burgundy
    Saddle Tan
    Light Stone
    Medium Bronze
    Sand

     

    Northern

    Northern palettes are heavily influenced by the colors found in the surrounding boreal landscape, from the evergreen foliage to the rocky mountains.

    Hunter Green
    Brite Red
    Koko Brown
    Taupe
    Light Stone
    Copper Penny
    Polar White

     

    Coastal

    Coastal regions also look to the local scenery for color inspiration, usually selecting colors found in the sea, beaches, and dunes.

    Hawaiian Blue
    Cobalt Blue
    Ash Gray
    Classic Green
    Copper Penny
    Sand
    Colony Green

     

    Tropical

    Tropical regions feature the most vibrant color palettes, pulling hues from exotic flowers and fruits. Oceanic colors are often widely represented as well.

    Hawaiian Blue
    Cobalt Blue
    Koko Brown
    Copper Penny
    Hunter Green
    Colony Green
    Crimson Red
  • Get Four Quotes

    Compare prices from local suppliers and save
    Get Prices
  • Architectural Style Type

    Architectural Style Type

    Specific color themes are more commonly associated with particular types of architecture. For residential projects, you’ll need to evaluate whether or not your metal house or building fits into a distinct architectural style, then narrow down your color choices.

    Even if your metal building is not designed according to these styles, having a corresponding home on the same property should influence your decision. Maintaining the same style theme between all buildings will give your property a more cohesive and attractive look.

    Modern Featuring bold lines and sleek finishes, modern architecture relies on a blend of minimalism and drama in color selection. This is why you’ll typically see bright whites, striking greys, and deep blacks on these buildings.

    Farmhouse Deeply traditional in style, this classic form of architecture uses timeless color schemes. Clean white is the most popular pick for siding, but barn red is another iconic choice.

    Ranch Ranch style is laid back and cozy, usually opting for subdued colors that instill a sense of calm. These often include creamy whites, soft beiges, and earthy browns.

    Spanish/Mediterranean Spanish and Mediterranean architecture typically features coloring naturally occurring in the clay and stone materials used. Therefore, it’s common to see terra cotta, golden tans, and mineral whites.

    Craftsman Craftsman homes have a unique character created by chunky features and bold lines. In addition, they often use stronger colors to match this more pronounced look, such as deep greens, rich browns, and moody blues.

    Victorian Victorian homes make a statement, combining colors and intricate details to create a fanciful appearance. It’s common to see anything from whimsical pastels and cheerful brights to somber and traditional dark tones.

    Cape Cod Cape Cod architecture has a soft and charming look, leaning toward the lighter end of the color spectrum. Pure whites, powdery greys, and soft light browns are all popular in this style.

  • Homeowner’s Association (HOA) Requirements

    If your property is part of an HOA, and you are planning on building a metal home, workshop or garage or placing another type of building on it, then you will need to make sure your color choices abide by your HOA’s restrictions.

    Many HOAs have specific color palettes that residents must adhere to. You will often need to select hues that are very similar to the other homes and structures already present in the neighborhood. HOA color restrictions can even require specific color combinations, limiting your choices regarding trim and roofing.

    Be aware that even if your color selection aligns with your HOA requirements, they may still object to the sheen of the finish or the use of metal as a material at all. We advise you to inquire with your HOA to ensure that a metal building installation is permitted before you start your project.

  • Colors Currently Present on Your Property

    If there are already other structures standing on your property, their colors may affect what colors will look best for your new metal building. Choosing the wrong colors can create a visual clash, which is displeasing to the eye and might lower your property’s value.

    For example, if there is already a structure featuring a muted, cool-toned color scheme, choosing a bright and warm palette for your metal building wouldn't be complementary. The best visual cohesion is achieved when you keep all of your property’s buildings within the same family of tones.

  • Visibility and Recognizability

    Selecting the right metal building paint colors can create a high-visibility exterior. This may be suitable for your needs if you’d like a building that is easily spotted from the road or if your property’s operations require an easy distinction between different structures.

    If you are running a commercial facility, optimal recognizability may also require picking a color scheme that aligns with your company’s branding. Choosing the trademark hues associated with your company’s logo makes it immediately apparent to customers and business partners that they’ve found the right place and that your metal building is a part of your company’s property.

  • Environment and Energy Efficiency

    Your building’s geographic location also affects color suitability for optimal climate control. If your building is located in an area with excessive heat or sun exposure, it might be best to choose paint colors that reflect UV rays. This will prevent the metal roofing and siding from absorbing the sun’s heat and transferring it to the building’s interior.

    Lighter colors work well in this respect, but it is also possible to choose paint formulations with enhanced heat emission and UV-reflection properties. These are typically marketed as “cool roofs” and “cool paneling,” as discussed below.

    Heat management should be a particular concern if you plan to use air conditioning in your metal building or if it will be used to shelter livestock or temperature-sensitive materials. The quality of certain crops, food items, chemicals, and even equipment and machinery could be compromised when overheated.

Get Four Quotes

Compare prices from local suppliers and save
Get Prices

Metal Roof and Siding Panel Paint Types

Your metal building color options can be limited by the type of paint you prefer to use. Paint types vary according to their specific features and durability, which are determined by their chemical formulations. Particular paint types will be more suited to different applications and conditions.

Polyester

Polyester paint is a basic, general-purpose formulation. Because it has fair weatherproof and lightfast properties, it is often used for exterior surfaces. Although polyester paint can be a solid choice, superior options are available. Basic polyester is, therefore, not widely used by our suppliers.

Metal Roof and Siding Panel Paint Types

Siliconized Polyester (SMP)

Siliconized polyester paint (SMP) is one of the two main types of paint used for metal-building paneling. A step above traditional polyester paint, SMP offers a good balance of durability and affordability. It has moderate performance in fade resistance, finish integrity, and UV reflection.

Using SMP paint can come with some problems. The color might not hold up well in climates with a high UV index or humid and coastal areas. Extreme temperatures have also been known to compromise its longevity. SMP is prone to “chalking” – producing a white powdery residue as the resins in the paint deteriorate.

SMP’s issues with chalking and fading are major detractions if you want to go with bright, vibrant colors, but they are far less troublesome if you are planning to pick light-colored paneling.

You may find that the color selection with SMP is not wide enough to meet your needs. Because SMP is not the preferred paint for top-quality products, it tends to only be available in limited color options.

Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF)

Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF - also known as Kynar 500® or Hylar 5000®) is generally considered the best paint for metal roofing and siding. It is formulated with a blend of 70% PVDF and 30% acrylic, allowing it to consistently outperform SMP in all domains.

PVDF is recommended for metal structures that must withstand heavy exposure to the sun, humidity, and pollutant particles in the atmosphere. Since it retains its shine and pigmentation well, it is the best choice when vivid or dark colors are preferred.

Another advantage of PVDF is that it is the paint type typically used for specialty colors and finishes, such as metallics and patinas. This means that you will enjoy a much broader spectrum of color options when considering your selections.

Because PVDF/Kynar is a best-in-class material, you can expect these paint options to cost more than those from lower tiers. Their outstanding performance and lifespan justify the expense.

PVDF Layer System

PVDF paint layer system

 

Color-Changing Polychromatic Paint (PPG)

Polychromatic paints are highly specialized formulations that subtly shift in color depending on the lighting conditions and perspective of the viewer. They are only available in metallic finishes and are hard to find.

Western State Metal Roofing is one of the few suppliers to produce this type of paint. The brand offers its patented VARI-Cool® in two color options, which transform between a number of hues.

 

Paint Warranties

The warranties available for specific paint colors and types are worth serious consideration. Choosing a paint that does not come with a sufficient warranty can create more expense down the road. Paint warranties may cover damage such as chalking, cracks, film adhesion, and fading.

  • PVDF:
    PVDF’s superior formulation tends to come with better warranties. Film adhesion is usually covered for a period of 20-40 years, while chalking and fading are covered for 10-30 years.
  • SMP:
    SMP comes with reduced coverage. While they might also meet the 40-year mark for film adhesion, they typically have shorter terms for chalking and fading. You will also encounter more exceptions to what is included in the coverage.
  • Polyester:
    Polyester paint comes with the shortest warranty. These usually max out at 20 years for film adhesion and often cover chalking and fading for only 10 years or fewer.

Get Four Quotes

Compare prices from local suppliers and save
Get Prices

Cool Roof Colors and Paints

“Cool” roof and siding treatments are the paints that have been formulated to provide enhanced levels of UV reflectiveness. By reflecting the sun’s rays, they reduce the paint’s degradation rate and absorb less heat as well. Cool coatings have been known to reduce energy costs by as much as 15%. Choosing a cool roof coating can make you eligible for LEED certifications and even tax incentives.

Regarding color selection, suppliers often offer a wide range of options for cool coatings. However, you’ll get the best solar reflectivity (SR) performance by choosing light colors such as snow white and bone white or light grays such as ash gray.

Cool paint formulations are usually rated according to their emissivity and Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) levels. Emissivity refers to measuring how quickly the coating will release any heat absorbed from the sun. SRI is measured on a scale of 0 to 100, identifying just how well the coating reflects UV rays. The higher the SRI level, the more effectively the coating reflects heat. (Additional discussion continues below.)

solar reflectance on metal roof illustration

SR and SRI Values for Standard Colors

To help you choose the best color for your roof, if LEED compliance or energy savings are a concern, use the table below to identify the colors with the highest SR and SRI values.

Note: Higher numbers are better for both emissivity and reflectance

Color SR SRI
Bone White 0.68 81
Snow White 0.65 79
Almond/Taupe 0.63 76
Silver Metallic 0.52 60
Light Stone 0.5 58
Saddle Tan 0.48 56
Brite Red 0.49 55
Ash Grey 0.46 52
Copper Metallic 0.46 51
DesertSand 0.42 48
Slate Grey 0.37 41
Rustic Red 0.36 40
Hunter Green 0.35 39
Colony Green 0.35 37
Medium Bronze 0.33 36
Crimson Red 0.33 34
Hawaiian Blue 0.31 31
Coal Black 0.3 31
Charcoal Gray 0.28 30
Koko Brown 0.28 30
Classic Green 0.28 30
Cobalt Blue 0.28 30
Burnished Slate 0.28 29

Get Four Quotes

Compare prices from local suppliers and save
Get Prices

FAQs

  • Can you Repaint a Metal Roof?

    Yes, it’s possible to repaint a metal roof with the right preparation, as required by the new coating manufacturer. In general, the roof should be cleaned via scrubbing or power washing. Residues will need to be rinsed away with an acidic cleanser, followed by rinsing with clean water. Any loose and flaking original paint should be removed by scraping. While some paint types won’t require a primer, you will likely need to apply a layer of galvanized metal primer before repainting your roof.

  • What Color Metal Roof Fades the Least?

    Less pigment means less fading. Lighter-colored roofing fades the least, making whites, light grays, and tans the most durable color options. Having more pigment creates more opportunities for fading. This is why richer, deeper roofing colors typically show the worst signs of fading, especially in environments with harsh sunlight.

  • What Does Painted Wall and Roof Paneling Cost?

    The color options you choose impact your project budget. As can be expected, unpainted roofing and siding will cost the least, while specialty paint finishes will be the most expensive.

    • Galvalume (non-painted) - $0.75-$1.50 per sq ft
    • Painted (standard colors) - $1.00 - $2.00 per sq ft
    • Specialty colors - $2.50 - $3.50 per sq ft

    * Prices vary depending on current steel coil prices and panel gauge.

 

 

Why choose us?

BuildingsGuide simplifies the process of finding reputable suppliers of prefab metal buildings, allowing you to select the ideal vendor for your needs and budget.

Since 2004, over 200K buyers have saved an average of 28% on their project with our multiple quote service.

Proudly serving customers in the United States & Canada for over 20 years.

Compare & save!

Let us help you find the best deal on a metal building for sale.

  • Tell us about your project
  • We match you with vetted suppliers
  • You receive four competing quotes
  • Select the most suitable supplier
  • Start your project